About Radon

Breathing Air

Almost all risk from radon comes from breathing air with radon and its decay products. Radon decay products cause lung cancer. The health risk of ingesting radon, in water for example, is dwarfed by the risk of inhaling radon and its decay products. They occur in indoor air or with tobacco smoke. Alpha radiation directly causes damage to sensitive lung tissue. Most of the radiation dose is not actually from radon itself, though, which is mostly exhaled. It comes from radon’s chain of short-lived solid decay products that are inhaled on dust particles and lodge in the airways of the lungs. These radionuclides decay quickly, producing other radionuclides that continue damaging the lung tissue.

1 in 15 Homes Have Unacceptable Radon

EPA estimates that the national average indoor radon level in homes is about 1.3 pCi/l of air. It is also estimated that about 1 in 15 homes nationwide have levels at or above the level of 4 pCi/l, the level at which EPA recommends taking action to reduce concentrations. Levels greater than 2,000 pCi/l of air have been measured in some homes.

Radon Deaths
Radon Deaths Compared to Other Causes

 

Any Exposure to Radon Can Cause Cancer

There is no safe level of radon–any exposure poses some risk of cancer. In two 1999 reports, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) concluded after an exhaustive review that radon in indoor air is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. after cigarette smoking. The NAS estimated that 15,000-22,000 Americans die every year from radon-related lung cancer.

When people who smoke are exposed to radon as well, the risk of developing lung cancer is significantly higher than the risk of smoking alone.